The Most Important Thing

It’s no secret – we’re all itching to find the formula to success. We’re constantly scrolling through various articles touting the best tips for negotiating, proper business wardrobe, greatest resume formats, supplemental skills to acquire, and more. We’re hoping that by implementing all this research we can elicit success.

While these all play their own role in amassing success, I was recently reminded of one key element that is easily the most important.

But first, some backstory.

If you’re in the entertainment industry you know the first part of the new year is known as pilot season and is the busiest time in the television world. While shows that are already on the air gear up for the second half of their season, a whole new slew of shows emerge to film one episode. This one episode serves as a pitch package with the hope that it garners enough interest to be purchased and picked up as a series.

Emotions run high during pilot season; sleep is scarce, coffee is stocked by the barrel and practically everyone works. Some people work for the very first time and some work double time to finish out their regular shows and then hop on a pilot. It’s a beautiful and also insane time.

This was my first year as an active participant in pilot season. After a whirlwind of screen and lighting tests I was selected to be Rachelle Lefevre’s stand in for the duration of the pilot she was filming in Chicago. I auditioned in the morning with a couple other lovely redheaded ladies, and at the conclusion of the audition, just as I began to put on my coat, the 2nd Assistant Director pulled me aside to ask if I could stay for the rest of the day. And just like that, we were off.

**A quick definition for “stand in” – Production selects a person to be a stand in who resembles the principal actor as closely as possible in terms of height, weight, hair color/length and skin tone. A stand in watches the principal actor they’re in for as they rehearse a scene and memorizes their marks (blocking) ready to hold their place once rehearsal ends and the main actor steps out. As the main actor steps out, the stand in steps in so that cameras, lights and any additional technical equipment have a body to set up around. Setting up the equipment takes MUCH longer than you think it would so instead of having the principal actor stand there for 20 minutes or so, production uses stand ins. Stand ins fill their actor’s marks and also don the appropriate “color cover” – a shirt the same color as the actor’s wardrobe in the scene. Having a stand in also allows the actor to get hair/makeup touch ups, talk with the director or simply grab something to eat. Second team (the team of stand ins) will often go through a rehearsal with the crew and director to ensure everything is set up correctly, determine timing if the camera needs to move and make any blocking adjustments if needed (which the stand in then communicates to the principal actor when they return). Our team of stand ins also memorized the lines in the morning for the scenes scheduled to film that day. Most productions don’t request that second team be memorized but this production preferred it, and so every morning we’d get there early to get our sides for the day and memorize before filming started. So I guess it’s kind of similar to being an understudy in theatre but understanding you will never, ever have the chance to go on as that role.**

That first day after my morning audition was a prep day to experiment with lights, special effects and camera lenses to make the most of our time during official production days.

As I stepped out of one of the lighting set ups to let Rachelle in, the director of photography motioned me over. At first my stomach dropped, I thought I had messed up on the first day and was about to get a lecture.

He lowered his voice and asked, “Do you know why you got this job?”

I blankly stared back trying to come up with a response. Before I could construct an answer, he continued:

“Your attitude. Yes, you have the look but those other girls had the look too. But when you walked in, you smiled, you were warm, you shook my hand, you were engaged and focused. You paid attention. Your attitude – that is the most important thing.”

His explanation surprised me more than it should have. We all understand that one’s attitude has a tremendous effect on any scenario. Especially when things go wrong, as they often do, it makes a world of a difference to approach a situation with a positive and professional attitude. As you’re reading this you’re probably thinking to yourself, “Well, duh. Of course you need a good attitude. We all know this.” However, if we’re all honest with ourselves, when we’re reacting in the moment the first response isn’t always positive. When we’re tired and frustrated it isn’t easy to maintain a professional and optimistic manner, but it’s critical for success and must be practiced. And what’s awesome is that your attitude is a trait you can cultivate and enhance anytime and anywhere without spending a penny!

I’m working in an industry that appears to pit performers against one another in a competition of who’s the most talented, the prettiest, the most experienced, or the most connected. That emphasis is terrifying, off-putting and incites a deluge of limiting beliefs. If you only remember one message from this post let it be this: your talent or skill level does not matter if you’re unpleasant to work with. I’m not diminishing the need to train and grow one’s skill set as a performer, or in any career for that matter, but what I’m trying to communicate is a positive demeanor will help open more doors – and keep them open.

For a long time I held myself back from countless opportunities telling myself I wasn’t experienced enough, talented enough, qualified enough, and so on neglecting the power of my personality. I’m sure I’m not the only one to stunt myself in this way. If you’re holding yourself back because you feel you don’t have the right skills or experience, I hope this reminds you that your attitude carries more weight than you think. It speaks volumes and will help you get in the door as you continue to build your skill set to reach new levels of success. It truly is the most important thing.

6 thoughts on “The Most Important Thing

  1. Kelly Porretta says:

    Becca! What you describe this gentleman’s impression of you was, that is what I felt when we were 1st introduced at YPAC! I know I have shared that with you before,but it’s fun to remind you. Incredible warmth and professionalism, hand in hand, great combo!! Plus, your smile and warm eyes definitely made an impression. Go find all THAT, other redheads, hahaha! Hearing you are exuding the same warmth even under greater pressure is fantastic, and I’m so happy for you Becca!

    Liked by 1 person

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